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  • Lives at stake
    Measure 101 isn’t perfect but it’s much better than putting the health care of more than 200,000 Oregonians at risk.
  • Noble work

    I was at a wedding at Our Lady of the Lake Parish in Lake Oswego last month. I picked up a copy of the Catholic Sentinel. You folks put out a great Catholic newspaper.

  • Aid or eject those who put partisanship over faith

    Unfortunately, these descriptors have been hijacked by a significant number of people who believe the end justifies the means and have clearly demonstrated they will accept sinful behavior by people willing to advance their agenda.

  • Social capital, intentionality can help ensure schools’ success
    Research in the 1980s identified what is called the “Catholic School Effect,” the reason that Catholic schools have been so successful in educating young people regardless of economic or ethnic background.
  • Jo Jo Wagner and the Christmas clown
    Unbeknown to the members, Jo Jo had already got on the blower and hired another clown for the children's bash. It was another Eagle acquaintance of Jo Jo's, a man who was also a clown.
  • Miracles do happen
    My husband’s recurrence of cancer came as a surprise. Nine years after his diagnosis of leukemia, we thought we had left the disease behind.

  • A Franciscan Christmas
    For me, this Christmas was a time of miracles and joy. When I returned to Oregon in October, I came with a mixed bag of emotions, everything from excitement to anxiety.
  • More women die of pregnancy-related complications in the United States than in any other developed nation. An overlooked and overlapping tragedy influences this alarming trend: Black mothers die at three to four times the rate of white mothers.
  • Beyond politics
    Some of us Catholics lean right, others lean left. Many of us track a moderate course. But all of us are disciples of Jesus, and that is what matters. We are brothers and sisters, not election foes.
  • The homeless person sitting on the corner near our church never moved off his bench despite freezing temperatures. No matter the time of day, there he sat bundled up in clothes people had donated.

  • In late December, as I returned home after an enthusiastic excursion to gather my last Christmas presents, the clicker to my parking garage door died. It looked like it was working; the little red light blinked just as it should when I pressed the "open" button.

  • Discernment begins in the everyday
    At the heart of the vocational question, "What am I to do?" is an existential one, "What am I here for and who am I?"
  • I long to be back in the pew, but the baby spits up again. The contrast cuts sharp in my mind's eye: the priest's hands holding shining gold vessels, mine swabbing stains with a damp burp cloth.
  • Now "gene editing" may soon allow parents to tailor the genetic makeup of their offspring, producing the "perfect" child (whatever that means when we adults have imperfect ideas about children).

  • From the Archives

    Portland’s quota in the Knights of Columbus war fund drive which begins next Monday has been fixed at $50,000 and the men in charge of the local campaign are making energetic preparations to secure that amount in the time allotted.

  • More leeway

    Concerning Judas Iscariot and eternal life, it seems there is more leeway/interpretation in the rules of mortal sin and damnation than when I grew up 60 years ago. Back then, eating meat on Friday was a sin.

    Regarding the comment that people who commit suicide may not have full responsibility, doesn’t this apply to most, if not all, suicides? How many people say to themselves, “I am going to kill myself primarily because I want to offend God and know by such action I will be so offending him and am fully consenting to this serious action”? — the three qualifications in the Baltimore Catechism.

  • A teachable moment

    Never in my wildest dreams did I think I would become some sort of de facto member of the Altar Society—but there I was on a Friday evening, YouTubeing videos of how to wash, fold, crimp, crease and prepare altar linens for Mass.

  • I confess to Almighty God and to you, my brothers and sisters, that I loathe New Year’s resolutions in my thoughts and in my words because of what I’ve done and what I’ve failed to do.
  • Big implications
    On Dec. 17, I was walking a friend’s dog. As we rounded a building with a handicap ramp hidden by bushes, she walked into the darkness, stopped, and looked back at me. She wouldn’t budge. 
  • Series inspired me
    Often I will re-read these articles and recall what the writers offered so eruditely on this profound subject: Faith and science are of truth, God’s truth of creation.
  • Boosted my soul
    I want to thank Archbishop Sample for stating in a very public way that we, like Protestants, desire to have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ.
  • Send us puppy photos
    We heard from some of you who filed competing declarations on behalf of your own dachshunds, Pomeranians and Shih Tzus. By Jan. 31 at 11:59 p.m., we will accept photos of your dogs at sentinel@catholicsentinel.org.
  • Way to go, Joe
    Joe Weston’s generosity and no-nonsense approach to giving back epitomizes Catholic education.
  • Pray for souls

    How many poor souls are still in purgatory because people just assume they’re in heaven?

  • Wrong theologian
    I made a mistake in referring to Father Raymond Brown. The name should have been Cardinal Avery Dulles.
  •  A CHRISTMAS ENCOUNTER IN SOUTHEAST PORTLAND

    What to my wondering eyes should appear

    But Santa, his sleigh and his eight faithful reindeer.

    I was dressed as a hiker, and with snow shovel in hand,

    Santa thought I was the maintenance man.

  • Misplaced priorities

    Congress did pass legislation late last year, funding CHIP for three more months, hardly reassuring. The half-hearted, short-term funding still tortures families worrying that their children’s health care might end.

     
  • Boon, not disaster

    The reformed federal tax plan would be a boon – not a disaster – for low-income Catholic students.

    The main reason is something De La Salle North Cathlic officials and the Sentinel omitted: the reform would double the basic family deduction to $24,000 from $12,000.

  • It’s the same old flawed environmental movement

    What about this face is new? I’ll stick to what I’ve been doing — trying to decrease my family’s contribution to pollution, teaching my kids about proper stewardship of the Earth and her resources, and encouraging others to do the same.

  • Preparing for advent

    Let us take these short weeks before the celebration of his birth to give thought to his coming, to ponder how the Lord has transformed our lives, to consider what more change he will bring and to think about how we are serving him as we might serve anyone we love.



  • ‘Where are you going?’
    God wants you to let him lead, but he will never force you to follow. So grab Christ’s reaching hand and surround yourself with others doing the same.
  • It is important to foster and strengthen the faith throughout our lives. During certain periods, that faith seems particularly vulnerable. One of these is the late-teenage or college years.
  • One church, one rosary, 100 years
    While this was indeed a celebration of community, each person who walked away from the scene felt personally touched by God.
  • The pen is mightier

    Dante Alighieri wrote, “He listens well who takes notes.” It turns out he wasn’t referring to laptops.

  • Amandio and the Christmas trees
    To me as a boy, back in the 1960s, the kind and honest Amandio became synonymous with Christmas.
  • The future of science and faith: A glorious and happy union
    There seems to be a misplaced belief of a conflict between science and faith. This is a false conception built on a foundation of a deficiency and scarcity of truth: an ignorance of history and a lack of understanding of the nature and origin of science, on top of an illiteracy of how God creates and his relationship to creatures.
  • The dignity of women

    That hordes of influential men have been harassing, assaulting, violating and raping women is more than a social or moral problem. There are theological implications. Men who use women as objects of pleasure are striking at the very heart of God’s plan, which was to save us from such debauchery through a selfless woman.

  • My conversion story
    Mine is a story of love. It is a testament to the unconditional, immense, constantly seeking love of God. It pays tribute to how God will wait, ever so patiently, for us to come to him, even if it takes years or a lifetime.
  • We must wonder how many will truly celebrate Christmas this year, making it the best ever? What is meant by a "true celebration"?

  • Richard Wilbur died in October. He was, Dana Gioia said, the finest poet of his generation and the greatest American Christian poet since Eliot.

  • Are we distracted receivers?

    As we prepare for Christmas, I am sure many readers have had the experience of thoughtfully selecting a gift for a child and laboriously tracking down the item. The present, upon being opened, brings moments of squealing, then disappears into a pile of shredded colorful wrap, forgotten within the hour.

  • From the Archives

    The site of the University could not be more charming, situated, as it is, on a high eminence overlooking the picturesque Willamette River, within the city limits, and in full view of Portland, whence it is easily reached by electric cars.

  • Bravo, Joe
    Mr. Weston, you will only know in heaven the impact of your generosity.
  • It makes sense
    Why even bother with the paid deniers and front groups who thrive by creating a false climate debate?
  • Jesus shows us
    I propose that all Jesus’ teachings show us the mind of God.
  • I am certain he is the humble, spiritual man I knew
    I remember him as a quiet, humble, and spiritual person who never said anything unkind about anyone.  Although I never saw him after this time, I am certain he is this way even today.
  • This Advent, imagine that you and your family lose everything. Home, neighbors, livelihood. This Advent, imagine that you have only one choice: Leave everything you know, you possess, you count on. Or die.

  •   November's Poor-Souls Sky
    Gazing upward in awe at the early cold November sky,

    As time and days are getting shorter in the light of life.

  • Not just for evangelicals
    Our free will means we can form ourselves by the mundane, by escapist entertainment, by political ideologies, by hatreds, fears, outrage and hubris.
  • We’re all after the truth
    Readers are hungry to see how faith and science coexist. It’s one of the great questions of the 21st century.
  • Problems with packaging

    I have just opened a fresh box containing an over-the-counter pain reliever and now need a double dose because of the discomfort caused by the act of prying the lid off the bottle.

  • Holding the pope's hand in gratitude for being Catholic
    Every now and then, I find in the offices of pastoral leaders and theologians, as well as in the homes of some families I know, a picture of them shaking hands with one of the recent popes.
  • Blessed Solanus Casey's witness to my family

    Pope Francis has said in the preparatory document for the upcoming synod on "young people, faith and vocational discernment" that we need to see credible witnesses in order to be inspired to be holy.

  • The ones who won't be home for the holidays

    This season sparkles with joy. We open our homes to family and friends, greeting each other at wreath-decked doors under twinkling lights.

  • What is sex for?
    The root problem here is a self-centered notion of freedom that "frees" individuals from respecting others, if such respect would get in the way of their own pleasure.
  • Searches beyond Google's capabilities

    A recent article in The Wall Street Journal noted the upswing in the work of reference librarians who are receiving more calls from curious seekers who either can't find what they are searching for on Google or just prefer to search for information with the help of another human being.

  • It’s about justice

    Some of the views expressed in the Sentinel on capital punishment have me concerned. From Catholic school and the Bible study, I was taught that the death penalty is not only or primarily about protecting innocent life but about justice for the victim and society.

  • It’s a win-win
    The deferred charitable annuity is the everyday earner’s answer to leaving a “Legacy of Faith” and ensuring a retirement nest egg.
  • Really cares?
    Merkley supports unfettered abortion and legislation aimed to keep anti-abortion demonstrators away from abortion clinics. When he speaks of being caring can he really be believed?

  • Trust fund does it
    The Archdiocese of Portland does not lend money to parishes. In mid-2009, the Parish Funds Trust was established as a business trust operating in the state of Oregon.
  • A spiritual solution

    The world is full of murder, sexual assault, slavery, war and other evil. Sometimes nationalism is to blame. Often there’s religious persecution or racism. And then there’s simply anger.

  • Promoting dignity
    This time of year, Catholics get a chance to show how the celebration of Mass explodes into the world. The Catholic Campaign for Human Development collection, being held in churches Nov. 18-19, is not just about social service.
  • Faith-inspired tips for being Christ’s love in the world
    I have recently thought about how my faith exhorts, encourages, and calls me to be Christ’s love in the world. What a beautiful phrase.
  • Take action against gun violence

    As both the nation and the U.S. church attempts to address this crisis, Pope Francis is also encouraging that conversation -- and also action.

  • A brief history of Thanksgiving

    Contrary to popular opinion, the first Thanksgiving was not observed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1621.

  • The ones who won't be home for the holidays

    This season sparkles with joy. We open our homes to family and friends, greeting each other at wreath-decked doors under twinkling lights.

  • Giving to God what belongs to God

    The idea that religious freedom is only or primarily for individuals may suit some versions of Protestantism; but in Catholicism and Judaism, among other religions, it is the believing community that is in covenant with God and confirms the faith of its members. Catholics pray that God will "look not on our sins, but on the faith of our church."

  • If you submitted anything on our online forms during August and September, we urge you to send it again.

  • From the Archives
    “Please, Holy Father, find my hus­band.” This is all. No name, no ad­dress, not another word.
  • It’s the reverence
    After much consideration I think the “content, reverence, and ritual” in the Extraordinary Form outweighs the Latin.
  • Too lenient
    He took a snippet of truth — one Democrat representative letting pro-life candidates use his committee’s money, not to increase pro-life elected officials, but to stanch the decreasing numbers of elected Democrats — and presented it as a good.
  • Great map
    I especially appreciated the addition of the map of Portland parishes on pages 34 and 35.
  • Prayer changes us

    The purpose of prayer is not to change God’s mind, but to let God’s mind change our life. Jesus taught us the perfect prayer: “Our Father, …your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”

  • Honor the 'Laudato Si' encyclical
    Let’s follow the guidance of Pope Francis’ encyclical to preserve a healthy climate for our us, our kids, and theirs. My heart tells me this is the right thing to do; my mind tells me that we must -- before it’s too late.
  • Puppy Love

    With five children in three schools, plus activities, appointments, and work, my husband and I didn’t think our lives were crazy enough. So, we bought a dog.

  • If you submitted anything on our online forms during August and September, we urge you to send it again.

  • A bug's life
    We live in a web of life, and when God’s creation is diminished we all are. Bugs are pollinators. They create fertile soil and feed birds.
  • The teaching is clear
    Here is the gist: With modern means of incarceration — secure life sentences without parole — executions are practically no longer needed to protect society; our focus now must be on the dignity life, even for killers.
  • Harvey Weinstein's not alone

    Harvey Weinstein is a pig. It's not language I would normally use in a column, but the cascade of revelations about his treatment of women and men, most particularly his twisted and apparently constant sexual advances, demands a blunt assessment.

  • New media environments change our sensibilities, even our religious ones
    A recent headline proclaimed, "Potential Senate candidate Kid Rock fires back at Eminem for his anti-President Trump rap." For someone who grew up in the 1990s, when unsavory rock/rap "artists" like Kid Rock and Eminem dominated the airwaves and Donald Trump was running casinos, this was terrifying to read.
  • From the Archives
    The issuance of this pastoral has caused great rejoicing throughout Portugal and it is predicted that the shrine of Fatima will soon become the “Lourdes of the Iberian Peninsula.”
  • Include context
    Gollum, of course, met his proper end, death, as his sins required.
  • She influenced me
    Much of my Catholic formation and religious learning and catechism came from Sister Clare when she headed the religious education (CCD) at St. Edward in North Plains.
  • It helps us heal
    Making peace with the church, whether or not we can return, helps heal.
  • Beware: Information being gathered on immigrants
    The Department of Homeland Security is taking steps to collect social media information from immigrants, including naturalized citizens living in Oregon.
  • The power to forgive
    If there is one skill humankind has mastered, it’s inflicting pain. We inflict pain on our adversaries. We inflict pain on our friends and families. We inflict pain on ourselves.
  • Fear begets murder
    At its roots, murder is so wrong because it thwarts God’s creative power. By snuffing out a piece of divine creation, the murderer takes the place of God. In every religious tradition, this is the transgression of all transgressions. 
  • Modern day Catholic hymn giants
    VICTORIA, Texas — I wonder if anyone else experiences the same distraction at Mass as I do. Whenever a hymn is announced, I go to the page, find the hymn, and begin to sing when everyone else does. But then, I glance over to see who wrote the lyrics and the music; then I look below to see when they lived, when they died, and maybe from what country the song came.
  • An American priest in Mozarabic Spain
    I discovered that among the many rites of the Catholic Church there is an ancient rite of Spain now called the Hispanic-Mozarabic Rite. I was thrilled. I already had a love for liturgy and the different rites of the church and to discover that my beloved Spain had her own rite — I couldn’t wait to learn more.
  • What savagery lies in the breast of man?

    A man untethered from family or God, a man whose value was the sum of what he bought and what he spent, is the most frightening being of all: a hollow man. And evil entered in.

  • Order from chaos: Learning from disasters' first responders

    How do they do it? I've asked that question countless times over the past several weeks as first responders and (extra)ordinary volunteers have jumped right in to help in the aftermath of recent, devastating hurricanes and earthquakes and fires in the Caribbean, Mexico and the United States.

  • Whole-life perspective: How one young activist thinks about social justice

    As a college student, I spend much of my time deliberating the great questions of our day, not least among them: the limp salad or the pizza? Shredded carrots and dressing could spruce up the former; the latter's grease I could dab off.

  • The Catholic Church and Halloween

    The medieval Catholic Church created the feast of All Saints on Nov. 1 to honor the blessed people who could not be included in the church's formal list of saints. In England, the word "hallow" was used to mean the sacred, and thus there the day was All Hallows' Day.